Give with Compassion - Kid's Corner

Our trips to Vietnam with Give with Compassion give us firsthand experience of the living conditions of those in real need. The people that we have met inspire us to do more; and oftentimes, solutions. These are some of our stories…



Marci Tran

Giving is to receiving!

... Every time we travel for charity work, I ended it up with 25 mosquito bites and it's swollen bigger than a size of an orange. But thank goodness for "dau xanh" (Tiger palm) it's help healing the bite so quick and stop the itchiness...

... Mỗi lần con đi làm từ thiện con đều bị muỗi cắn. Có lần con bị muỗi cắn tới 25 đốt, muỗi cắn sưng lớn như quả cam. Nhưng cám ơn chai dầu xanh nhờ nó giúp con chữa lành vết cắn rất nhanh chóng và không bị ngứa. Con rất thích dầu xanh ...

Hi my name is Marci, I am 11 years old. This is how I feel about Vietnam.

During summer 2016 my family & I are traveled to Vietnam. My parents showed me the country they grew up in. And how helping others help you feel good about yourself as my mom always say "giving is to receiving".

While Vietnam has amazing food, breathtaking views, it's also is fill with giant blood sucking mosquitoes. And humid weather that makes you drenched in sweat. I love Vietnam because of the delicious food, cool stores, and the Ubers driver that flash their taxi with AC to cool down their customer.

The most amazing is driving around the city in the motorcycle. They are everywhere in Vietnam. People called its "Xe Honda". I learned the cultural tradition that I never learn and know before. I met a lot of new people and together we have lots of fun. We shop, we do hover boarding, and they telling me things that I never knew about Vietnam.

Every time we travel for charity work I always get bitten by mosquitoes. One time I ended it up with 25 mosquito bites and it's swollen bigger than a size of an orange. But thank goodness for "dau xanh" (Tiger palm) it's help healing the bite so quick and stop the itchiness.

The charity trips were so tiring. We would drive 5 hours or more to the very rural area of Vietnam. In some rural area the bus can't go in, so we have to walk for several miles to meet people and give out gifts and candies to the children of the villages. It's was hard, it's was tiring but afterward it all very worth it. Because I was able to see the happiness in peoples smile. I love to bring joy and smile to the less-fortunate people. Yes I would do it again, again, and again but will I need lots of "dau xanh"

If anyone was to ask me which was my favorite place in Vietnam I would hand down and say Nha Trang and Da Nang. Nha Trang was fill with beautiful views and clear water beaches, it's also wasn't as crowded as Saigon. Da Nang was a cool place with lots of ancient ancestor town that people still shop and walk in today. While in Nha Trang Kayla and I also got our own hotel room with no parents (just kidding, they are next door and the room is connecting with a door). The best part of Da Nang was the ragged white water rafting. Where my dad and I are got splash while hitting the rocks and bouncing to the other side. It's was very, very, very fun. And very cheap we only pay $5 for water rafting. We also did zip lining in Nha Trang because it's only cost $5 (that's why my dad let me)

My trip to Vietnam was unforgettable and who knew across the world would be so different. I hope to visit again soon. Oh well, not that soon may be after I visit Europe?

Wrote by Marci Tran
Con tên là Marci, con 11 tuổi. Con thích về Việt Nam.

Mùa hè năm nay, gia đình của con đến Việt Nam 3 tuần. Việt Nam là nơi ba, mẹ con sinh ra và lớn lên. Trong khi con đi du lịch đến Việt Nam, con học cách giúp đỡ người nghèo và các em bé. Mẹ của con luôn nói với con "cho đi sẽ được nhận lại". Và khi giúp đỡ mọi người con cảm thấy rất vui, con cảm thấy con rất tốt và con rất thích.

Việt Nam có nhiều thức ăn rất ngon, và rẻ và con thích tiền Việt Nam vì con thấy con rất giàu. Khi con ở Việt Nam con là millionaire (hi hi hi).

Ở Viêt Nam có muỗi hút máu rất to và rất nóng, lúc nào con cũng có nhiều mồ hôi. Con thích đi xe Honda vì rất vui, ở Việt Nam có rất nhiều xe Honda. Con đã học được rất nhiều điều lạ mà con không biết. Con gặp rất nhiều người và con có thêm bạn mới rất vui. Bạn nói cho con biết những điều mà con chưa bao giờ biết về Việt Nam.

Mỗi lần con đi làm từ thiện con đều bị đều bị muỗi cắn. Có lần con bị muỗi cắn tới 25 đốt, muỗi cắn sưng lớn như quả cam. Nhưng cám ơn chai dầu xanh nhờ nó giúp con chữa lành vết cắn rất nhanh chóng và không bị ngứa. Con rất thích dầu xanh.

Các chuyến đi từ thiện rất là mệt. Con phải ngồi xe 5, 6 giờ mới tới các khu vực nông thôn của Việt Nam. Có những nơi xe không lái vô được con phải đi bộ rất xa, rất là mệt để gặp mọi người và phát quà, bánh kẹo cho trẻ em trong làng.

Tuy con rất mệt nhưng khi con nhìn thấy mọi người vui và các em bé cười vì được kẹo, con cũng vui theo. Con sẽ về Việt Nam nữa và con sẽ đi từ thiện với ba mẹ, nhưng con sẽ cần rất nhiều dầu xanh vì con sợ muỗi khổng lồ ở Việt Nam lắm.

Con thích Nha Trang và Đà Nẵng. Nha Trang đẹp và bãi biển nước sạch, Nha Trang không đông như Sài Gòn. Đà Nẵng là một nơi thoáng mát với rất nhiều người đi mua sắm ở phố cổ Hội An. Khi ở Nha Trang con và bạn Kayla (Phương Nghi), được ở riêng 1 phòng trong khách sạn không có ba mẹ, tụi con rất thích. (chú thích: phòng ba mẹ và phòng của tụi con thông nhau bằng 1 cánh cửa)

Khi ở Đà Nẵng con được ba Sơn cho đi trượt thác nước Phú Thành rất vui. Trượt nước ở Việt Nam rất rẻ chỉ có $5. Ở bên đây khi con đi Utah trượt thác nước tới $100 luôn. Ba nói mắc quá, mắc quá. Trượt nước ở Việt Nam vui hơn ở Utah rất nhiều. Ba còn cho con đi zip lining và cũng chỉ tốn $5. Ở Việt Nam thứ gì cũng rẻ.

Con hy vọng sẽ sớm ghé lại Việt Nam. Nhưng con muốn đi Châu Âu rồi mới quay lại Việt Nam

Marci kể lại bằng tiếng Việt pha lẩn tiếng Anh, Mimi Trần viết giúp, tại San Diego, ngày 24 tháng 8, 2016


Trent Nguyen

My Summer Vacation in Viet Nam!

... I was sorrowful that kids were standing out in the hot weather and pleading for money so they could buy food. Also, when I saw their ripped clothes and had no shoes, it felt like my heart crazed into tiny pieces. From that experience, I learned to appreciate what I have now and be thankful for the family I have...

During this summer break I traveled to Viet Nam. We arrived at the airport in the afternoon on June 27, 2016 and went to the Sanouva Hotel in Saigon. Our first day in Viet Nam was very exciting. We went sightseeing and visited the city.

For example, my family and I went to go visit my mom’s family. After we visited for a few minutes we went to go eat lunch. Then we went shopping at different malls and then ate dinner with my mom’s family again. The next day, we flew from Saigon to Nha Trang. We stayed at the Best Western Hotel which was a 5 star hotel so I enjoyed spending 3 nights there. After we dropped our suitcases at the hotel, we walked around to see what was near the hotel.

The next morning we went to the beach for a few minutes and then went to the pool. We swam and played for a couple of hours. After that, we ate dinner and went to sleep. The next day, we went to help and feed the poor and homeless people. I was sorrowful that kids were standing out in the hot weather and pleading for money so they could buy food. Also, when I saw their ripped clothes and had no shoes, it felt like my heart crazed into tiny pieces. From that experience, I learned to appreciate what I have now and be thankful for the family I have.

Soon after Nha Trang, we went to a place called Ba Na Hills. Also, Ba Na Hills was one of my very favorite places to go. In order for you to get to Ba Na Hills you have to take a lift to get up there. My favorite ride there was when you get to go in a cable car and you get to control how fast you want to go. Also, we got to see the longest cable car in the world. A few days later we took a flight back to Saigon and visited my mom’s family again. I would like to visit Viet Nam again because I really enjoyed learning about my country.

Wrote by Trent Nguyen


Luca Phung

The Trip to Viet Nam!

... I went on several trips in Vietnam to help kids and adults alike. The truth is, not all the people in Vietnam are fortunate to have what we have in the United States. I remember some of the highlights of these trips. For example, one time, I went to a hospital and helped hand out food to the people who were preparing to undergo eye surgery. Another time, I was handing out food and supplies to kids in an orphanage...

Going to Vietnam was a new fun learning experience for me. After arriving in Saigon, Vietnam, I noticed so many different changes. The main mode of transportation there was by motorcycle, unlike in the United States where it's by car. The streets and buildings were very clustered and tight. To accommodate space, all the buildings and houses were built upward rather than to the sides. There was a lot of trash left on the ground and almost nobody bothered to clean it up. It was very interesting to see how the people lived in these conditions. One of the major differences was the amount of mosquitoes in Vietnam. Almost everywhere I went, I would get bitten by a mosquito, whether it be a big one, or a small one.

Of course, there were a lot of fun activities and places to visit that made up for some of these new changes. I visited a lot of different cities which offered different kinds of foods and things to play. In my opinion, I’d say that Vietnam probably has the best beaches! The water is almost always warm which makes swimming very fun and enjoyable.

My trip to Vietnam wasn’t just for fun though. I went on several trips in Vietnam to help kids and adults alike. The truth is, not all the people in Vietnam are fortunate to have what we have in the United States. I remember some of the highlights of these trips. For example, one time, I went to a hospital and helped hand out food to the people who were preparing to undergo eye surgery. Another time, I was handing out food and supplies to kids in an orphanage.

All these trips made me realize how fortunate I was, to be able to live and grow up in the United States. I will never forget all the memories I made in Vietnam. My trip to Vietnam certainly was a life changer.

Wrote by Luca Phung


Dominic Phung

Give with Compassion!

... Give with Compassion isn't just another fundraiser, it's the fundraiser that gives 100% of all money donated to help Vietnam. It is giving with compassion...

Vietnam was a monumental experience of a lifetime. No words can ever describe everything that I encountered in those three weeks. It is strange that although Vietnam is so very far from the United States, it is so very close in our hearts and mind. The throbbing atmosphere coupled with the fragrant, delicious smell of Traditional Vietnamese food all encompass the immense culture of a small, southeastern country in Asia. Yet, as part of a community of tourists that visit Vietnam, we share a relative sense of sadness and grief. Where is the room for this sadness in such a festive environment? As we enjoyed the spectaculars of Vietnam, many people were of lesser fortune. Of course, people are always less fortunate than others but unlike the United States, equal opportunities simply does not exist in Vietnam. This can be even further taken as the government does not hold the needs of its people as its highest priority.

A story that I seen with my own eyes proves this right. In the misty morning of the Mekong River, a river located in Southern Vietnam, the Vietnamese people began their day of work. My family and I were boarding a riverboat to witness the daily market floating on the water. The breeze was cool on my face and I was excited to see what the market holds. Fifteen minutes later, the first boat began to park next to our boat and soon another and then another. They all sold fresh produce, the freshest right from the farm. In the midst of chaotic commerce, we began to notice that families were living in the boats even kids. Were they gonna go to school later in the day? No. Their entire life was on and with the Mekong River. That was their whole world, just a boat floating down the river selling their produce.They never had the opportunity to make their life something that they desire. And the government surely aren't gonna help these destitute families.

That's where Give with Compassion Foundation comes in. We fund raise and directly use the money to help and support those families giving them the opportunity that evaded them for generations. But the foundation isn't just restricted to that. We directly interact with the people and listen to their stories on how to improve other people's lives as well. Give with Compassion isn't just another fundraiser, it's the fundraiser that gives 100% of all money donated to help Vietnam. It is giving with compassion.

Wrote by Dominic Phung


Aaron Nguyen

My Vietnam Story.

... Going to those rural areas made me realize how lucky I am, to have a nice house, nice food, and a roof over my head to come home to every day. It shows how fortunate I am compared to many other people who don’t even have a home...

Hello! My name is Aaron, I’m 13 years old, and this is my Vietnam story. In the summer of 2016, I traveled with many other families to Vietnam.

We were shown the country we came from and the culture of the many different parts of Vietnam. Vietnam was great, because of the great food, culture, the feeling of arriving at your nice ac-cooled house after a long hot, humid, tiring day. Since Saigon is so packed, we either Uber everywhere or go my motorcycle, which is such a relaxing experience. We have tried new foods, explored the city, and went hover boarding.

Whenever we would travel for charity, we would take extensively long bus rides which would go on for hours. In addition, every now and then, the bus driver would honk his insanely loud horn, which would always wake me up when I was trying to sleep. It was a lot of work, but, giving out the gifts and helping other people live their lives whether it was food, money, or giving kids candy, it made them happy and me happy.

Going to those rural areas made me realize how lucky I am, to have a nice house, nice food, and a roof over my head to come home to every day. It shows how fortunate I am compared to many other people who don’t even have a home.

Other than charity, I went all around Vietnam, but, an area in Vietnam called NhaTrang, was the most outstanding part of the trip. We boated to an island, where the water was cool, clear, and just amazing. I snorkeled, picked up a giant starfish, and jumped off of giant floats. Even more great things to add, zip lining, water rafting, and, I even got my own hotel room, for free! That's not the best part, the zip lining, water rafting, only cost $5. In the long run, I would love to come back to Vietnam. It was a memory I’ll never forget.

Wrote by Aaron Nguyen


Maggie Tran

My First Trip to Vietnam Changed the Way I think of Life

... The rush of emotions I felt on the charity trip are indescribable; I felt sad, touched, and mainly fortunate. Thanks to the trip, I appreciate more what I have; to know how fortunate I am; to know how lucky and loved I am...

My Vietnam trip is going to stay in my heart forever. Every last detail will be remembered. But the charity trips have impacted my life so much. Every day I go to sleep seeing there’s a roof over my head, a bed to sleep on, and the dinner I just ate. And then I wake up frustrated that I have to go to school, but then I realize that my opportunity to have an education in America makes me so fortunate.

The moment I stepped into Vietnam, it hit me that I live in a bubble, unaware that there are families that struggle to put dinner on the table and live in something that I wouldn’t even consider calling it a house.

When I walked onto the people’s doorsteps to give them their food of the week (s), it leaves me speechless. All I can do is smile--- a pitiful smile. Their clothes, their home, their lifestyle makes my heart sink. One lady invited me into their home; it was smaller than my own room. All there was, was a table and a mat. Standing in their house made me feel some type of way that I can’t even put in words, I was so speechless.

The rush of emotions I felt on the charity trip are indescribable; I felt sad, touched, and mainly fortunate. Thanks to the trip, I appreciate more what I have; to know how fortunate I am; to know how lucky and loved I am. Now that I’m back, those images are burned into my mind and have affected my everyday life. I hope that one day my generation will be able to see what I saw in Vietnam.

Wrote by Maggie Tran


Ariana Vinh

My Summer Trip to Vietnam

... There were hundreds of families lined up waiting in the hot sun for gifts from GIVE WITH COMPASSION Charity. It filled me with sadness. We passed out rice, instant noodle, cooking oil and money to the people. Seeing all the families who weren’t as lucky as I was to have a nice house, good food and education which made me appreciate everything I have at home more...

I will always remember the time I visited Vietnam in summer 2016. It was so different than any other places I have been to. I arrived to the county on June 25th, after being delayed in Taiwan, for a day. Taiwan was just as humid as Vietnam. The flight was about three hours long and then we arrived in Vietnam. The streets were filled with motorcycles, and I constantly heard different noises. There were many mosquitoes, and the air was always so humid and hot. It made my skin always feel sticky.

Cyclos, or “xích-lô” which was a type of tricycle that the driver sits behind the passenger seat. Sitting on the little cart when the driver paddles behind is very fun and relaxing. When I went on the motorcycle, I saw stray cats and dogs. It was sad to see chickens in the cages waiting to be sold at the market. My favorite part of the trip was when we went to Nha Trang. The hotel I stayed at was beautiful with a delicious buffet that served “phở’, and different Vietnamese traditional food. Nha Trang had many beautiful beaches with warm water. There was really good “cơm tấm” street food. After spending 3 days at Nha Trang we visited Ba Na Hills in Da Nang. The long cable car had breathtaking views up to the mountain resort. The resort was just like Disneyland theme park. There were performance, rides and good food.

When I helped in the charity to help poor families, it made me feel grateful to live where I am. There were about hundreds families lined up waiting in the hot sun for gifts from GIVE WITH COMPASSION Charity. It filled me with sadness. We passed out rice, instant noodle, cooking oil and money to the people. Seeing all the families who weren’t as lucky as I was to have a nice house, good food and education which made me appreciate everything I have at home more.

I also went to three different orphanages. I remember at the 1st one we passed out candy to the kids. Some of the kids were taking bath nearby ran over and begged for some. The 2nd shelter we visited had many young newborn babies. The youngest orphanage child was only 17 days old. Seeing this made me feel very sad. The 3rd place we visited I saw kids as young as few days old and others were almost in their twenties!

Traveling to Vietnam made me appreciate how lucky I am to have a nice house, good food and education, while other people around the world struggle everyday to have somewhere to sleep and food to eat. I will never forget my trip to Vietnam, that changed the way I think of life.

Wrote by Ariana Vinh


Nathan Vinh

My Experience in Vietnam

... During a trip in Hue we walked past a street with homes off in the small village. The children ran out from their homes begging for money, “Cho con xin tiền”. Their homes were poorly made and many children asked us to buy their bananas. It looked like they were trained to beg tourists for money. It saddened my heart to see them...

Over the summer I went to Vietnam along with many other families as part of a charity mission. As soon as I stepped out of the plane I noticed all of the differences compared to the US. When I got out into the streets I noticed the people had a different style compared to America. There were many street vendors and hundreds of people jammed on the small streets. It was a sea of pedestrians, motorcycles, and cars. It was much more hot and humid. Thank goodness for air conditioning however.

We ate lots of Vietnamese traditional food there and traveled to many cities throughout the trip. In one city we drove for hours until we reached a rural village. I remember looking out the window and seeing misty fields of rice. The driver explained that the people in the village farmed to make a living. We handed out packets of noodles, money, oil, and rice. There were hundreds of people waiting, some wearing plastic bags to shield the rain. Their tattered clothes and poor circumstances made me feel grateful for the life I have in the US. In all the cities, children and adults, would come up to us and relentlessly ask us if we wanted to buy lottery tickets. Those lottery tickets were their income, their food, and clothes. One of my favorite memories was in Nha Trang. We drove a boat to this island filled with floats and fish. I saw many different fishes and sea life there. In Saigon I saw many monkeys and stray dogs. We roamed the city and I saw many markets and motorbikes on the street.

When we went to the orphanages I remember handing out candy for the children. The kids crowded around me, handed outstretched hoping to be given one. They all lived, slept, and ate in one place. Their eyes showed sadness, and made me feel bad. The children craved attention and joyfully hugged my mother. Many of the sleeping babies were abandoned, taken in by the people. Looking at the children made me feel sad, they did not have a family or home like I did and did not receive good care and education. During a trip in Hue we walked past a street with homes off in the small village. The children ran out from their homes begging for money, “Cho con xin tiền”. Their homes were poorly made and many children asked us to buy their bananas. It looked like they were trained to beg tourists for money. It saddened my heart to see them.

The trip was a wonderful experience for me and everyone else. I have learned to be grateful for the life that I have here. I have a house, clean water, food to eat, and education. I also do not get bitten by mosquitoes as much! I hope someday I will get to return to Vietnam again.

Wrote by Nathan Vinh
Kayla Nguyen

Always be grateful for what you have

... The most important thing that I took from this trip was to always be grateful for what you have. Even if it's the smallest amount of something, you’d never know what it might get you...

Hi, my name is Kayla. I am 12 years old, and I went to Vietnam for the first time in the summer of 2016.

My first time in Vietnam was an awesome experience. I got to visit my mom’s ancestor’s house and I figured out that my great great grandfather worked for the king of Vietnam.

The charity work was a draining but amazing experience. The group and I went on long bus rides to give gifts to families in need. I remember when I went into a woman’s house and there was only room for a bed. She had to cover her house with big leaves when it rained. She didn’t have air conditioner or a kitchen. But even when she is living with these harsh conditions, she always had a smile on her face. I also remember when I went to a hospital and I met unfortunate people who needed eye surgery. Our charity paid for everyone who got a surgery that day.

Whenever I think about those poor families or see a picture of them, I wish I could give them food and clothes. I finally was able to give them food that would last them a lot longer than it would last us. I became so much more grateful for everything that I have, from the food I eat to the clothes I wear.

The most important thing that I took from this trip was to always be grateful for what you have. Even if it's the smallest amount of something, you’d never know what it might get you.

Wrote by Kayla Nguyen
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